Human Rights Watch: Freedom Waning In Tunisia

13, 2013 at 10:36 AM TUNIS, Tunisia, Sept. 13 (UPI) — Tunisian authorities are taking drastic measures to silence their critics, Human Rights Watch said Friday. Tunisian authorities this week detained labor leader Walid Zarrouk and summoned journalist Zouhaer al-Jiss for issuing statements critical of the government. Joe Stork , director of Middle East programs at Human Rights Watch, said the government was using the law to limit free speech. “Instead of trying to silence critics, the government should look into their allegations, and fix the laws from the old repressive government that criminalize criticism of public figures,” he said in a statement Friday. With public support waning, Tunisia has struggled to make enduring political gains since the Jasmine Revolution unseated long-time leader Zine al-Abidine Ben Ali two years ago. The revolution was sparked by the protest suicide of a street vendor in late 2010.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.upi.com/Top_News/Special/2013/09/13/Human-Rights-Watch-Freedom-waning-in-Tunisia/UPI-42721379082992/

Human Rights Watch presses for Sri Lanka boycott

Human Rights Watch has urged Commonwealth leaders to boycott an upcoming summit in Sri Lanka to protest against the country’s failure to investigate abuses by its military during a decades-long fight against separatists.AFP/File COLOMBO (AFP) Human Rights Watch Friday urged Commonwealth leaders to boycott an upcoming summit in Sri Lanka to protest against the country’s failure to investigate abuses by its military during a decades-long fight against separatists. The New York-based group has written to the leaders of the 54-member bloc urging them to stay away from the November 15-17 summit hosted by Sri Lanka and send only a low-level delegation. “The Sri Lankan government should be shunned — not rewarded — for failing to hold anyone accountable for war crimes during the country’s recent conflict,” HRW’s Asia director Brad Adams said in a statement. Canadian Prime Minister Stephen Harper has already announced he will boycott the meeting, but others including British Prime Minister David Cameron are expected to attend. Harper’s government has also criticised the Commonwealth for “accommodating evil” by allowing Colombo to host the biannual summit. HRW said Sri Lanka’s rights record under President Mahinda Rajapakse “remained poor” and his administration had become increasingly authoritarian. The HRW statement came after the UN human rights chief Navi Pillay raised fresh concerns for the safety of journalists and activists she met during a week-long fact-finding mission to the island last month.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://www.foxnews.com/world/2013/09/13/human-rights-watch-presses-for-sri-lanka-boycott/

Venezuela Leaves OAS Human Rights Group

Ladies and gentlemen, For human rights development, there is no best, only better. The cause of human rights of China has attained enormous achievements obvious to everyone, but China is still the largest developing country in the world, and still faces such problems as an excessively large population and great regional disparities. Its environmental and ecological protection is enduring considerable pressure, and its development is still threatened by imbalance, disharmony and unsustainability. In the development of its various causes, there are still many problems concerning the actual interests of the people, and the improvement of people’s living conditions and the protection of human rights are still facing many challenges. All these have to be solved with more strenuous efforts. China has formulated two sessions of the National Human Rights Action Plan. The National Human Rights Action Plan (2009-10) was implemented on schedule, and all goals in the Plan have been achieved, in particular, about 35 percent constraint indexes and more than 50 percent indexes concerning people’s living conditions have been fulfilled ahead of the schedule or over-fulfilled.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://africa.chinadaily.com.cn/opinion/2013-09/14/content_16969758.htm

Advancing human rights development

21. The attack brought the United States to the brink of a military intervention the Syrian civil war, now in its third year. The New York-based group said it examined documents from the alleged chemical attack on Ghouta, and that the nerve agent used was most likely, sarin. The group said its activists were unable to go to Ghouta to collect remnants of weapons, environmental and bodily samples such as hair and blood to test for the chemical agent but that they sought technical advice from an expert on the detection and effects of chemical warfare agents. To support its claims, the rights group said it analyzed witness accounts and the type of rockets and launchers used in the attack. HRW also said its experts studied documented medical symptoms of the victims and analyzed activist videos posted on the Internet after the attack. Human Rights Watch released its conclusions in a 22-page report Tuesday. This evidence strongly suggests that Syrian government troops launched rockets carrying chemical warheads into the Damascus suburbs that terrible morning, said Peter Bouckaert, HRWs emergencies director.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://nypost.com/2013/09/10/human-rights-watch-condemns-assad-for-alleged-chemical-attack/

Human Rights Watch condemns Assad for alleged chemical attack

(AP Photo/Miraflores Press Office, Francisco Batista)AP2012 CARACAS, Venezuela Venezuela’s withdrawal from the Inter-American Court of Human Rights has caused concern among rights groups and leaders at the United Nations who worry that the move could heighten political persecution in the South American nation. The socialist-led government’s pullout from the Organization of American States-affiliated court took effect Tuesday, a year after the late President Hugo Chavez announced it would do so. President Nicolas Maduro tweeted that the court is “a tool to protect US geopolitical interests” and “harass progressive governments.” “The so-called human rights system, the inter-American court and the commission, are by-products of an instrument of persecution against progressive governments that began with President Chavez’s arrival,” Maduro added at a press conference on Monday, according to Al Jazeera. Venezuela has not quit the OAS itself and technically remains bound by orders of its Inter-American Commission on Human Rights. The Latin American nation’s move to leave the court has drawn repeated pleas from the United Nations, which is worried about the political situation in the country under Maduro. Regrettably, this withdrawal becomes effective today. We want to repeat our concern that this decision may have a very negative impact on human rights in the country and beyond, the spokesperson for the Office of the UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, Rupert Colville, told reporters.
For the original version including any supplementary images or video, visit http://latino.foxnews.com/latino/news/2013/09/11/venezuela-leaves-oas-human-rights-group/

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